BREAKING: The James Webb Telescope has found the oldest galaxy and scientists discovered a strange thing

20/07/2022
Credit image: Naidu et al, P. Oesch, T. Treu, GLASS-JWST, NASA/CSA/ESA/STScI
Credit image: Naidu et al, P. Oesch, T. Treu, GLASS-JWST, NASA/CSA/ESA/STScI

Article by: Andacs Robert Eugen, on 20 July 2022, at 08:11 am Los Angeles time

The oldest galaxy in the universe has just been found by the most powerful telescope, the James Webb Telescope.

James Webb found a galaxy that may have existed even 300 million years or less after the Big Bang, which means the galaxy is more than 13.5 billion light-years away.

The previous record was made by the Hubble Telescope, which discovered a galaxy about approx. 400 million years after Big Bang, under the name GN-Z11.

The discovery of the James Webb telescope is being analyzed by researchers at the Harvard and Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Massachusetts, who named it GLASS-z11.

Also, the GLASS-z11 has a mass of one billion suns, and a radius of 2300 light-years, much smaller compared to that of our galaxy 100,000 light-years.

At a mass of one billion suns, scientists expected the stars to be 500 million years old after the Big Bang, which contradicts the idea that the difference between the Big Bang and the galaxy is only 100 million. for years. This leads scientists to believe that stars formed much faster than now.

"We found two very compelling candidates for extremely distant galaxies," says Rohan Naidu, a graduate student in the university's astrology department, told New Scientist.

"If these galaxies are at the distance we think they are, the universe is only a few hundred million years old at that point."

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