Mysteries of the Needle's Eye, a Dwarf Spiral Galaxy presented in this new image

23/05/2022
Credit image: NASA, ESA, and H. Feng (Tsinghua University); Image processing: G. Kober (NASA Goddard/Catholic University of America)
Credit image: NASA, ESA, and H. Feng (Tsinghua University); Image processing: G. Kober (NASA Goddard/Catholic University of America)

Article by: Andacs Robert Eugen, on 23 May 2022, at 12:34 pm Los Angeles time

A new image of the Hubble telescope received by NASA and ESA shows a spiral dwarf galaxy, also called Needle's Eye, NGC 247 or Caldwell 62.

This optical spiral galaxy is more than 11 light-years away from us, but the high-quality image captured by the Hubble Telescope looks like the galaxy is just a stone's throw from Earth.

It is in the Sculpture Group which is also the closest group of galaxies to ours (the Local Group) in which the Milky Way is located.

NASA says that this group received the name Sculptor because of an end of it that appears without stars, it is just a gap.

However, it cannot be seen in this image, because Hubble did not focus on that end, but on the dwarf galaxy itself.

The image shows a lot of mysteries, such as the hole on the other side of the galaxy or the ultraluminous X-ray source in NGC 247.

About these very strong X-ray signals, the scientists concluded after a lot of research that they could come from a disk around an intermediate-mass black hole.

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