NASA is now studying the latest photograph of a nebula taken by Hubble. See here

30/11/2021
Credit: NASA, ESA, A. Hajian (University of Waterloo), H. Bond (Pennsylvania State University), and B. Balick (University of Washington); Processing: Gladys Kober (NASA/Catholic University of America)
Credit: NASA, ESA, A. Hajian (University of Waterloo), H. Bond (Pennsylvania State University), and B. Balick (University of Washington); Processing: Gladys Kober (NASA/Catholic University of America)

News! On the last day of November, NASA comes up with a fantastic discovery of the planetary nebula captured by Hubble. Now, NASA is trying to explore what is in that nebula, because as it says, this planetary nebula is extremely complex. The name of the nebula is NGC 6891 and is in the constellation Dolphin.  As you can see in the picture, the nebula has a compact inner part and an outer part like a circle around it. That circle around it (the outer part) is called the outer halo, and this part of the nebula expands much faster than the inner nebula. 

In addition, NASA has assumed that it has at least two ellipsoidal shells, oriented differently, but difficult to see in the image above. Inside the interior you can see a small spherical object, it is actually the white dwarf bone and the filaments and nodes inside the nebula surround this dwarf star. After more research, astronomers at NASA estimate that the outer halo is about 28,000. This very old age means that the nebula is full of mysteries, from its creation until now. 

NASA's mission is to observe as many things and phenomena as are happening in this nebula. Before NASA began studying it, Hubble studied it first and took several pictures, one of which was above. NGC 6891 is a mostly blue nebula, which means it is hotter than other nebulae. Why? Because the hottest part of a nebula is the blue part, and NGC 6891 has this part, almost the entire nebula is made up of this part. The nebula is made up of gas that was ionized by the dwarf star, which further removed electrons from the hydrogen atoms of the NGC 6891 nebula. 

But why does the nebula glow? 

NASA says, "As energized electrons return from their higher energy state to a lower energy state through recombination with hydrogen nuclei, they emit energy in the form of light, causing the nebula's gas to glow." 

We wish NASA and Hubble success in exploiting this new nebula as much as possible! 

Article by: Andacs Robert Eugen, on 30 November 2021, at 07:44 pm Los Angeles time

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