News! NASA's Juno spacecraft has collected an audio recording from Ganymede. See here

18/12/2021
This image of the Jovian moon Ganymede was obtained by the JunoCam imager aboard NASA's Juno spacecraft during its June 7, 2021, flyby of the icy moon. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
This image of the Jovian moon Ganymede was obtained by the JunoCam imager aboard NASA's Juno spacecraft during its June 7, 2021, flyby of the icy moon. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

Breaking news! NASA's Juno spacecraft has collected an audio recording from Ganymede. An audio track collected during Jupiter's Ganymede mission, NASA announced a few hours ago. NASA's Juno mission was the one that was able to achieve this success, during a flight near the moon of Jupiter, Ganymede. Yesterday, December 17, 2021, NASA and scientists at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union in New Orleans discussed the sounds heard from Ganymede, as well as Ganymede's magnetic field, its motion and the remarkable comparisons between Jupiter and the oceans. and the atmospheres of the Earth. 

All the sounds Juno heard were put into an audio track and sent to NASA. Juno's recordings date back to June 7, 2021, and only now has the information been confirmed by NASA. In any case, NASA probably could not see them in June, because this information comes from an extremely long distance, so whatever happens now and what Juno is studying, we might we only hear about them next year. 

Like any other spacecraft, Juno has an instrument that collects these sounds. Juno's instrument is Juno's Waves, which collects data about emissions from magnetic radio waves produced in Jupiter's magnetosphere. All audio recordings sent to NASA were analyzed and then some were put into 50-second audio. "This soundtrack is wild enough to make you feel like you're walking past Ganymede for the first time in more than two decades," Bolton said. "If you listen carefully, you can hear the sudden change at higher frequencies around the midpoint of the recording, which is the entry into a different region of Ganymede's magnetosphere." 

Juno collected these sounds from Ganyemde both at night and during the day, so some sounds are very different from each other. This is due to the position of the moon, its magnosphere and sometimes even how close it is to Jupiter. The closer you get to the planet, the farther away you will have different sounds.

According to William Kurth of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, co-principal investigator for the Waves investigation: "It is possible the change in the frequency shortly after closest approach is due to passing from the nightside to the dayside of Ganymede,", he said. The distance from which Juno took these recordings is relatively small: 645 miles (1,038 kilometers) above Ganymede's surface and traveling at a speed of 41,600 mph (67,000 kph), according to NASA. This happened on the spacecraft's 34th flight around Jupiter.

We wish NASA and the spaceship Juno a lot of success to discover new mysteries of the moon Ganymede! 

Article by: Andacs Robert Eugen, on 18 December 2021, at 01:53 am Los Angeles time

You can write your news here: https://www.bailey-universe.com/en/ad-your-news/

Bailey Universe contact: baileysitecontact@gmail.com

If there is any news about Ganymede, Juno or other space news, we will let you know, but don't forget to subscribe to be announced here 

Be the first to read what's new from space!